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Intro


Cisarua Learning

Refugees can be part of the solution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Australian Public Benevolent Institution with tax-deductible (DGR) status.

Charity ABN: 19 621 094 022

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Intro


Cisarua Learning

Refugees can be part of the solution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Australian Public Benevolent Institution with tax-deductible (DGR) status.

Charity ABN: 19 621 094 022

About Cisarua Learning.

Cisarua Learning is a Public Benevolent Institution established to support refugee-led initiative and education in Indonesia. Our flagship project is the Cisarua Refugee Learning Centre (CRLC), a refugee established school outside of Jakarta. 

Our idea is that ‘refugees can be part of the solution’. We uncover sleeping leaders in refugee communities and encourage them to start their own refugee-led initiatives. And then we accompany them for as long as they need.

The charity is project-managed by Jolyon Hoff, Muzafar Ali, Khadim Dai and Tahira Razai.

 
 
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Success


Success


Success

It has been an incredible journey so far. Nearly 200 students are learning at the CRLC, including more than 50 older women and mothers who are attending school for the first time in the afternoons. 

100% of the refugee families resettled from the CRLC are successful in their new countries. They are ALL in jobs, studying at university, or have entered their age-appropriate school years without any English training.

The CRLC has inspired 10 refugee-led schools in Indonesia. There are 1500 refugee kids learning from around 100 refugee teachers. It is a refugee-led education revolution.

Thousands of Australians have been inspired by our feature documentary, The Staging Post (shot by 17 year old refugee Khadim Dai). More about the film at thestagingpost.com.au.

The idea that ‘refugees can be part of the solution’ is gaining traction with global decision makers, and the Cisarua Refugee Learning Centre is a remarkably successful example. 

Join Us

The refugee's success brings us joy and, in the decades to come, we know that they will become powerful and successful individuals, wherever they end up. At the same time, the UNHCR in Indonesia has recently told them that they could be stuck for up to 25 years and that it is very possible that they will never get resettled. So we are determined to provide an ongoing voice for refugees living in transit, and be an organisation which can support their initiative for as long as they need.

A monthly or one-time donation will help us to continue this ongoing commitment. Follow us on social media. There are fantastic stories of resilience and courage happening all the time.

If you have any questions please contact us at admin@cisarualearning.com.

 
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The Community


The Community


About the Community

There are approximately 5000, mainly Hazara, refugees living near Cisarua, Indonesia.

Persecuted by the Taliban, they have sold everything they own, and borrowed as much as they can to get to Indonesia. With people- smuggling boats no longer going to Australia, they must hope to make it through the long and opaque United Nations resettlement process. It could take years, and there is no road back.

On 2014, a small group decided to start a school, The Cisarua Refugee Learning Centre. Unbelievably, through the school, the refugees found they were having the best days of their lives. Instead of sleeping all day, they got up early to go to class and to prepare lessons. Parents made lunches and delivered their kids to school, proud that they were able to provide an education for their children. They even started a school football tournament, and the female teachers played football for the first time in their lives.

Underneath all this excitement and optimism is the reality that they are refugees. They cannot work in Indonesia, or be resettled there. The school is not officially registered and could be closed at any moment. Any financial or medical emergency could mean complete disaster for the families, and the Taliban continue to kill and bomb their relatives and friends back in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

They are in the middle of a real life gamble, and the stakes could not be higher. If they are not successful, there are no second chances.

The Cisarua Refugee Learning Centre gives them hope, a sense of community, an identity, and an education.

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The Board Members of Cisarua Learning


The Board Members of Cisarua Learning


More photographs from the school


More photographs from the school


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Follow


Follow To follow our journey please leave your details here, or send us a message at admin@cisarualearning.com

Follow


Follow To follow our journey please leave your details here, or send us a message at admin@cisarualearning.com

 
Name *
Name

Photography courtesy of Muzafar Ali.

 
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Annual Report 2015 - 2016


Annual Report 2015 - 2016


Our Annual Report

What an incredible 18 months it's been since we started Cisarua Learning Inc.! (now Cisarua Learning Limited)

We are so proud to present our first Annual Report. Thank you to everyone, especially the teachers, managers, students and their parents from the CRLC. Their bravery and dedication, while living in the middle of a such an unknown and difficult journey, is an inspiration to us all. It’s an honour to represent you. Your hard work is inspiring people all around the world.

Please enjoy this update from Cisarua Learning Inc.(now Cisarua Learning Limited)

From deep in our hearts we thank everyone for their support.

Yours Sincerely

Jolyon Hoff and Muzafar Ali

 

 

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Media


Media


 

At the Cisarua Refugee Learning Centre we are proud to be presenting positive stories about refugees. Below is a selection of stories that have appeared in newspapers and television around the world. 

 
 

BBC World

 The CRLC students experiencing how to be a journalist at the BBC office in Jakarta.

The CRLC students experiencing how to be a journalist at the BBC office in Jakarta.

Indonesia has not signed the UN Convention on Refugees, meaning asylum seekers are not able to work or get an education in the country.

 

Radio National ABC - The Refugee School Of Hope 

 Cathy Peters from ABC Radio National with teachers from the CRLC.

Cathy Peters from ABC Radio National with teachers from the CRLC.

Some have been in the queue ten years. But through the school they've found hope. They're up early to go to class and prepare lessons. They have skills to share. Parents make lunches and are proud they're able to provide an education for their children. 

 

Sydney Morning Herald -  Frontiers of Hope | Indonesia to Australia

Khadim Dai at the Cisarua Refugee Learning Centre that he co-founded

Khadim Dai has met Oscar-winning filmmakers and Indonesian politicians. He was a panellist on the SBS show Insight and is being recruited by the art school at Monash University in Melbourne, where lecturers have described him as the most talented young artist they have seen in recent memory, and where a scholarship has been created to try to bring him to Melbourne.

 

Sydney Morning Herald - Learning Centre Helps Asylum Seekers Cope 

 CRLC students during school time.

CRLC students during school time.

Just two months ago, these children were bored and aimless, dislocated from their home countries and stuck in temporary accommodation as their school years ebbed.

 

Radio Australia - How Learning Is a Lifeline For Refugee Children

 My name is Arzoo, I am 12 years old from Afghanistan but I was born in Pakistan.

My name is Arzoo, I am 12 years old from Afghanistan but I was born in Pakistan.

I want to be a scientist in the future and invent new things that will help my country, or become an artist so I can paint pictures which express the pain and feelings of those experiencing war, such as my people in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

 

Inside Indonesia - Resisting Limbo

 Children at Play at the CRLC 

Children at Play at the CRLC 

Even before the school comes into view, I hear the shrieks of delight of children playing. As I enter the gates I see parents chatting with one another while maintaining a watchful eye on their little ones. Teachers brainstorm about lesson plans for the next day, and talk excitedly about their upcoming soccer game on the weekend. Administrators sit outside their humid office looking frayed at the end of another day. These are the familiar sights and sounds of a school anywhere in the world.

 

The Conversation - Refugee-run school in Indonesia a model for governments to emulate  

 Students in a school run by refugees in Indonesia learn maths, English, art and science

Students in a school run by refugees in Indonesia learn maths, English, art and science

A school set up by asylum seekers and refugees in the West Java town Cisarua, Indonesia, is an initiative that Australian and Indonesian governments should model and support. 

In August 2014, refugees from Afghanistan in transit in Indonesia established the Cisarua Refugee Learning Centre (CRLC) to provide education for their children.

 

Mamamia - The refugee run school transforming young people’s lives

 The youngest student at the CRLC 

The youngest student at the CRLC 

"My country destroyed my childhood. It failed to shelter me. Sometimes I wish that I would wake up in a world where there is no Taliban, no war, and no children crying."

In the first few months of her stay in Indonesia, Farahnaz faced a lot of difficulties. She told me about how she was “crying for two months” because she missed everything and nothing was familiar to her anymore. “There was no school, we didn’t know anyone. Time went by very slowly.” But when the Centre was opened, she “immediately joined,” and came to “love the feeling of learning and teaching.”

 

ABC News - Exiled by Taliban, karate black belt trains asylum seeker children

 Arzo with her Karate teacher in Cisarua 

Arzo with her Karate teacher in Cisarua 

"When they are coming to sports they are very relaxed, that's why karate is good for us." 

 

The Global Observatory - Refugee Transit in Indonesia: The Critical Importance of Community

 Refugee children play during a break at the Cisarua Refugee Learning Centre. Cisarua, Indonesia. 

Refugee children play during a break at the Cisarua Refugee Learning Centre. Cisarua, Indonesia. 

The community was formed around a refugee-run school that opened in August 2014 and now has 200 students and 17 volunteer staff. The school has provided the community a focal point and shared project in which all are heavily involved. Many other activities have grown from this, including men’s, women’s and mixed soccer teams, art exhibitions, a karate club, and at least two more independent schools. The community has a strong social media presence and manages its own public representation, focusing on a narrative of refugee capacity rather than need. The UNHCR have visited the school, as have journalists, NGOs, and researchers.